This Will Make You The Curtain Panel BOSS!

It’s amazing how details add so much to a simple curtain panel.  A simple banded edge is an easy addition, and I share another consideration here that I’ve never heard mentioned before.

This technique will make you The Curtain Panel Boss!

How could we not be concerned about fading fabrics?

In case you missed it, I discussed all you need to know on Facebook Live.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fcurtainqueencreates%2Fvideos%2F1745208368826794%2F&show_text=0&width=560

It sure pays to plan ahead.  When we follow guided steps in order, things just work easier.  You know?

If you haven’t downloaded my guideline for sewing curtain panels, don’t miss out.  Get it now.

In yesterday’s post, I asked what time of day is best for you to take part in Facebook Live videos.  It really is better if you are watching Live – for me, at least.  I’m planning to be on Facebook Live this Saturday.

I ask you again to please share in the comments what time is best for you:  10 AM, 12 NOON, 5 PM, or 8 PM CST.

Blessings~

I’m sharing at Metamorphosis Monday.

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How to Use a Glue Stick for Pattern Matching Your Seams

Huh?  A Glue Stick?

I sometimes visit Pinterest just to look around for new techniques I can use in my sewing. As a matter of fact, I’ve created a Home Decor Sewing Board on Pinterest.  There are so many great techniques collected on the 473+ pins there!

I was blown away when I saw Jona at Stop Staring and Start Sewing  use a glue stick to secure a zipper until she stitched it into a pillow.

I immediately had an idea to try her glue stick technique when matching the fabric pattern in a seam.

How to Use a Glue Stick for Pattern Matching at Seams

I went to Wally World and bought a purple glue stick like Jona used in her project.  It dries clear.

How to Use a Glue Stick for Pattern Matching at Seams

I wanted you to see where I used it on the selvage.

How to Use a Glue Stick for Pattern Matching at Seams

But, it didn’t show the coloring very well until I got really, really close with the camera.

How to Use a Glue Stick for Pattern Matching at Seams

Rub the glue stick on the front side of the selvages of both fabric pieces.  Align the patterns to match with right sides together.  Press well  – yes with a hot iron – on both back sides  of the selvages so you don’t get glue on your iron.

How to Use a Glue Stick for Pattern Matching at Seams

Ironing the glue melts it into the weave of the fabrics and dries the glue faster.  You might imagine it would get hard, but it stays pliable.  After a few minutes when it cools, it’s pretty well set unless you try  to pull the pieces apart, which why would you when you want it to stay together long enough to stitch it permanently?

Glue doesn’t get on your sewing machine or needle since you only put the glue stick on the selvage part – not the fabric itself.

Fold at the matching point (picture above) and press.  That’s the line where you’ll stitch (picture below).

How to Use a Glue Stick for Pattern Matching at Seams

Test the selvage to be sure they’re bonded well enough to take it over to your sewing machine.

When the selvage is stuck together securely, it’s time to sew!

How to Use a Glue Stick for Pattern Matching at Seams

There’s no need for pins or guess-work of aligning printed sides while you stitch.

Voila!  A perfect pattern match.  Now you can trim the selvage away at your seam allowance.

How to Use a Glue Stick for Pattern Matching at Seams

Isn’t that a neat trick?  Thanks for the great technique, Jona!  I’ll definitely use the glue next time I put a zipper in a pillow.

So…do you think you’ll try Jona’s glue stick technique?  Don’t you love learning new things on Pinterest?

Oh, and one more thing.  Every time I plan a Facebook Live, I wonder what time of day is best for your schedule.  Pick a time (or times) that you prefer and tell me in the comments below.  The point of Live is to see it Live, right?

10 AM, Noon, 5 PM, or 8 PM – all Central time zones, so adjust to your time zone in your mind as you decide.

Blessings~

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How to Shop On-Line for Decorator Fabrics – Plus Five Top Resources

My choice has always been to shop local stores and feel  the fabric I’m buying for window treatments, pillows, and such.  I want to touch it!

With on-line sources, you can still touch fabrics before buying.  Ordering a sample is easy – and sometimes with no postage added to the small price.

How to Shop On-Line for Decorator Fabrics

All stores have detailed descriptions of their fabrics and small samples for fairly cheap.  I recommend ordering sample swatches before ordering large amounts of fabrics (especially if you like to feel the fabric first.)  Also, no colors are true on-line since our computers display colors differently.

What to look for when purchasing decorator fabrics on-line:

  • Fabric content
  • Yarn dyed over piece died (yarn dyed has better durability and resistance to fading)
  • Price per yard and yardage available
  • Check width to be sure it’s at least 54″ wide (width less than 54″ indicates it’s not a decorator fabric and probably has less body)
  • Thread count per inch might be helpful information since a tighter weave is usually better
  • Vertical and horizontal repeats, which helps you know how much yardage to purchase.

Speaking of yardage repeats, get my free Yardage Calculation Worksheet and watch the companion video for completing the worksheet.

Also, check out my Pinterest  board for on-line fabric sources.  See over 400 Pins on my Home Decorator Fabrics Board!

I must tell you that I will receive no commissions for sharing these on-line companies with you.

The first one (which I’ve used in the past) is Brick House Fabrics.  The fabric I ordered came quickly and in line with their fabric description.  HH enjoys this pillow in his chair still after almost three years.  The fabric has not worn at all and has held up splendidly!

Brick House Toille Fabric

Sew-Easy Fringed Pillow…click image to see post.

Decorative Fabrics Direct seems to have the best stock of popular fabric choices.  (Lots of fabric styles!)  One option is my recent pursuit of red and white buffalo check, which is normally very hard to find.

Red and White Buffalo Check FabricSource Page

One drawback here is that the price is a little higher than I wish to pay, so let’s keep looking.

Fabric Guru has the absolute best prices but with limited choices.  Many fabrics have only enough yardage for a very small project.  I did find this buffalo check with enough yardage in a light blue and white for under ten dollars a yard.  Cashmere Blue.  Tempting!

Cashmere Blue Buffalo Check FabricSource Page

The best price for the red and white check is at Best Fabric Store.  (Could be the winner!)

Red and White Buggalo Check Fabric

Source Page

You’ll like what you see there…a coupons page – and free shipping for over $35/order.  I’m in!  🙂

Back to Brick House Fabrics on-line, the red and white buffalo check is pricey at $34 per yard.  Yikes!  But, the shipping is free for orders over $75.

Online Fabric Store has a 1″ check in several colors – and at a good price, but I want the larger check – 2″ at least.  Also, it’s listed as a gingham, so I suspect it’s a lighter weight fabric than I’d want for covering chair cushions.  (Oops!  I blew that surprise!)

Red and White Gingham FabricSource Page

 

So, are you ready to find fabric for your next project?  This information will certainly get you started in the right direction.

Blessings~

 

 

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How to Live Free

Along with the questionnaire in last week’s post (Without Love, I Am Nothing), Barry St. Clair talks about what love is  and then what love is not.  If you missed it, go back and take the quiz quickly and return to this post.  St. Clair’s Moving Toward Maturity Series is very good, not only for youth but for all ages.

The questions we saw last week are more relevant for seeing what isn’t loving.  Self-centered competition with others isn’t loving.  The drive to get more attention than others, acquire more things than others, only causes us to put a feather in his cap and call him Yankee Doodle!  Do you remember that song?  Haha!  For some odd reason, it came to me as I was writing the first part of the sentence.  Haven’t thought of it in years, but it seems to fit the bill.

Competition keeps us from having deep, loving relationships with others, says St. Clair.  So loving others means getting the focus off of ourselves!  Competition creates an environment that is the opposite of how we are to treat others.

Image Source

The bottom line is that we have trouble being the person Jesus wants us to be and treating people how He wants us to treat them when continually trying to “one-up” them.

When you looked at your quiz results, did you feel defeated?  Did you feel you can never live up to the standards of “good scores” in all eight areas of jealousy, boastfulness, arrogance, rudeness, selfishness, irritation, resentment, and rejoicing in wrong?

DON’T stress about it.  The point of this exercise is to realize you can only be who God wants you to be because Jesus lives in you.  Jesus is the reason.  You have the good qualities already when you have Jesus.

He guides us to His  perfection, not our own.

Because we have Jesus, we have all the love we need.  We just need to follow Christ closely to be sure we’re exhibiting His character, not ours.

Does that help you feel better?  I hope so.  Jesus frees us.  Live in His freedom.

Blessings~

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Ideas for Creating a DESIGNATED Sewing Space

I remember the days when I kept my sewing machine in a closet. It stayed there most of the year, but occasionally, I’d remove it and set it on the kitchen table for sewing. What an inconvenience!

When sewing for Fun Son’s baby room (24 years ago), I realized I should set up my sewing machine in the guest bedroom. The rest is history.

Creating Your Designated Sewing Space

Having a designated sewing or project space is a total game-changer.  It’s much easier to pop into that room, sew for fifteen to thirty minutes of available time, and leave everything out and ready to sew again the next time.

After kids came along, it sometimes was a challenge to find a workable space.  So, I understand how that might be the case for you.  These ideas from Houzz.com are helpful and creative.

In this case, a corner is all you need!

Santa Ynez

Borrow a small area of a guest room or the master.

My Houzz: Midcentury Heirlooms and Artwork Charm a 1908 Mississippi Home

Does this look like a transformed dining space – or an extra bedroom?

Gallery Loft

When we lived in a suburb of Atlanta, nearly every home in our area had a built-in desk space in the kitchen. What an awesome place to sew! Imagine the sewing you could get done while stopping only briefly now and then to stir the pot.

European Casual Rumson NJ

I love how several of these examples show using a simple table.

Sewing Room/Gift Wrapping Room

This one is probably my favorite…very inventive, practical, and such a great idea for a revamped linen closet!

Xqzet

This would be a dream of a laundry room!

2nd Floor Laundry Room

Imagine a laundry room that’s much smaller (more of an average size), where the room ends just to this side of the machines. The sewing spot at the end of the room would still be so doable in that smaller space.

Cubbage Laundry Room

This looks like another space in a corner of a bedroom. Plenty of natural light is always a good thing.

Roberts Creek House

All you need is one wall, a couple of drawer stacks with a board extended over them for seating under the table top. Very simple yet completely functional.

my vintage look sewing room

It looks like this is the corner of a family room…extra convenient!

my pocket workspace via desiretoinspire

Yes, the closet.

Closet Offices / Becky Harris

Any new ideas here for creating or tweaking your sewing spot?  Which one is your favorite?

Blessings~

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Quick Bib Napkins From A Tea Towel DIY

Last year, I bought two tea towels from Wal-Mart’s summer stock.  They’re thin yet large – nearly thirty inches square. I had an idea recently to make bib napkins from those large tea towels.

Bib Napkins From A Tea Towell

To make large napkins for eating fish, shelling seafood, and lapping up barbecue, I had an idea to split a large tea towel in half.

Bib Napkins From A Tea Towell

Right down the middle.  (Press in half and cut along pressed line.)  A bonus is that you get four bib napkins from the purchase of two tea towels.

You’ll need to open the stitching at the corners of the cut edge.  Snip the threads about an inch or so.

Bib Napkins From A Tea Towell

Fold the corner under and press.

Bib Napkins From A Tea Towell

Fold the raw edge under at a quarter inch.  Fold again at a quarter inch and press again.

Bib Napkins From A Tea Towell

Stitch along the pressed edge and at each corner.

Bib Napkins From A Tea Towell

Isn’t this easy?

Choose a ribbon or cording from your stash.  Cut 36″ lengths. Knot each end and stitch onto the top corners of your napkin bib.

Bib Napkins From A Tea Towell

Since 36″ is long enough for the largest man, adjustments are needed for a smaller person.  Simply knot the length to take up some slack.

Bib Napkins From A Tea Towell

ID Diva makes a good model for this new bib napkin design.

Bib Napkins From A Tea Towell

Voila!  See how quick and easy these are?  The bib napkins are long enough to truly be a bib and a napkin in your lap at the same time.  (Sort of like an apron?  Ha!)

That reminds me of the Dollar Tree Tea Towel Apron  I made four years ago (and ID Diva modeled – back when she was truly a Spunky Daughter.

Dollar Tree Tea Towel Apron

Isn’t it funny how things change but yet they stay the same?

Blessings~

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