Valances on Boards

In the world of window treatment design, we’ve gotten away from valances. It’s been all about panels for several years now.

Panels

But, in case you still want a valance or two, I thought I’d talk about something other than your typical shirred-on-a-rod valance treatment. A more custom look is to mount your treatment to a board. I pulled this old one out of my work room to show you a little about mounting and hanging. Just plopped it on top of my stair railing to snap some pictures, y’all, so nothing fancy here.

Valance on Board

I made these to fit our living room windows at the Georgia house, where we had two single windows. When we moved, I joined the boards together, because we now have a double window. This valance was eventually removed altogether when I received some panels from my MIL for the living room/office.

Using a straight bracket, but a large and sturdy one, I joined the two valance boards together.

Double Valance Bracket

I normally mount boards to a wall, but these needed to go inside the window casing. I attached an L-bracket to each end, on the top side to avoid putting screws through my treatment on the sides when attaching to the wood casing.

For this type of application, use two brackets at each end for extra strength. Notice you don’t see the ugly stapled fabric edges on top of the board. You don’t have to do yours this way, but it looks better to cover the top with a “finishing strip”.

The finishing strip is made by cutting a fabric strip the size of your board and ironing 1/4″ under on all sides. Then attach it with only a few staples up there. No need for many, because you’ve done all the securing staples underneath.

Valance L-Brackets

If you think covering the top doesn’t matter because it won’t show, consider the view from all angles. Can you see the top of your treatment as you come down the stairs? Is there a loft area above? The slightest elevation allows all that ugliness to show, so you’ll probably be happier in the long run if you do it right the first time.

Speaking of staples, it drives me crazy to see a treatment with staples exposed on the front side. Everything should be stapled on the top of the board, nothing on the front. If you absolutely must staple the front, it should be under a pleat, some gathers, or trim. In the past, if I had no choice but to staple the front, I planned ahead for some sort of trim or fringe to hide those shiny little things.

Since this treatment was installed inside the double window casing, I arranged the brackets different from my usual way. Another factor was the transom above the double windows, all one window unit with no wood to screw a bracket into along the length of it. It’s the same type of window as in the dining room, which is the first picture on this page. The ends held all the weight, so the strongest brackets ruled here!

When mounting along the top and inside a window casing, like below, no brackets are necessary. My favorite way to hang boards! You simply screw through the board into the upper molding. All screws are hidden behind your treatment.

Roman Shades

This same room has a door, so I made the same working Roman shade for our door. Here you can see how to attach a board to a door, wall, or case molding.

Mounting Board to Door

The L-brackets hold the treatment securely. Plan ahead for your width of treatment to allow room for the mounting brackets if you plan to attach outside your window case molding, unless it’ll be mounted well above the window.

Notice I covered the board with the window treatment fabric. Normally I cover it with lining fabric, the ugly hot-glued side “up” (where your finishing strip will cover it all). With this Roman Shade, the ends are visible, so I didn’t want ugly white lining glaring at each end. It pays to think ahead and consider all angles.

If you’re just beginning to make your own treatments, make lots of notes, draw sketches, with separate sketches to include all measurements. No need for artistic ability here, just getting it down so you can “picture” the end results. I always make “finished” measurement sketches first, then adapt that to “cut measurements” for each piece. It may seem backwards, but I start with the big picture, then I break it down. Plan each step of the process before you make the first cut.

I hope I’ve provided a little information to help your treatment be beautiful and easy to hang.

5 Time-Saving Tips for Making Window Treatments

Sewing curtains is much like cleaning house.  We don’t necessarily do it because we love the process – but because we love the result – a clean house!  Are you that way, too?

For years, I stitched together window treatments for others.  I squeezed time for sewing between young mom responsibilities.  I crawled out of bed extra early for a couple of stolen sewing hours in the morning and carved away little snippets of sewing time throughout the day.  I made the most of those little blocks of time.  And I mean little!

People often tell me how they wish they could sew, but they don’t have time.  Let’s rid ourselves of that defeatist attitude.  Let’s get creative with our schedules, shall we?

5 Time-Saving Tips

My Top 5 Tips for Making Time for Sewing Window Treatments

Tip #1:

Schedule blocks of time.  Yes, put it on the calendar!  Block out time chunks in the largest blocks you can manage.  (Even small ones are better than nothing, if that’s all you have.)  You won’t know how much you can accomplish in half an hour until you schedule it and work through it.  Try it.  You will be amazed at how much you accomplish in thirty minutes!

Tip #2:

Turn your phone settings to DO NOT DISTURB (DND).  In your phone settings, set a time frame to not be disturbed!  That’s right.  No notifications to distract you.  And, you can still get calls from family and friends who are on your favorites list.  So, if a family member has an emergency, they have access to you during DND.  I love this feature and have a recurring DND for sleep hours every night!  I use it during the daytime for focused work time, too.  Notifications distract, and who needs that?

How to set your phone or DND (Do Not Disturb):

i-Phone:

  1. Go to Settings
  2. Click on Do Not Disturb.
  3. Press the “From and To” to enter your start and stop time.
  4. Click the Scheduled Tab to “On”.
  5. Press “Allow Calls From” and choose Everyone, No one, or Favorites.
  6. Turn on the “Repeated Calls” tab if you wish to hear a second call from the same person within three minutes (which might be an emergency).
  7. Under “Silence”, check Always or Only while iPhone is locked.

Android:

  1. Go to Settings.
  2. Click on Sounds and Notifications.
  3. Scroll down to Do Not Disturb and click the title to go to the screen with the different settings.  Turn “Set Schedule” to “ON”.
  4. You can set the start time and end time you desire for your phone to be on Do Not Disturb mode.
  5. You can also allow exceptions for receiving calls from your favorite contacts only by clicking “Allow Exceptions”,  Click “ON”.  Click “Calls and/or messages from”, and a short menu pops up.  Select the “Favorite contacts only” option to allow calls from friends and family in your favorites list to get through when they call (needed for getting emergency calls).  You can also choose to receive other notifications such as text messages by clicking the “Allow exceptions” tab.
  6. Be sure your the tab is turned to “ON” to activate Do Not Disturb mode before leaving the settings screen.

Tip #3:

Be diligent about limiting time on social media.  Set social media time slots in your schedule and stick to them.  Limit time on Facebook and other media time-gobblers.  Get control of your social life!

Tip #4:

Do project mapping.  Map projects in advance in an orderly, step-by-step, sequential manner.

Tip #5:

Begin your project with the end in mind.  Focus on what you’ll enjoy when you finish – how you’ll enjoy your finished project.  It will boost you through the steps to completion and motivate you!

Blessings~

I’m sharing this post at Metamorphosis Monday.

Need Affordable Curtains? Do THIS!

What do you do when you need affordable curtains?  These helpful tips should keep your budget in line.

Need Affordable Curtains?

Tip #1:  Make Your Own Curtain Panels

You can make curtain panels by following some basic steps.  The process is really simple and shown in this post.

Tip #2:  Shop the Fabric Sales

After posting pictures of our kitchen last week, I was super motivated to get the curtains made and hung.  I purchased the fabric two months ago during a big sale at PHI Fabrics in Tupelo.  You can also order fabrics from them on-line.  Check them out here.

Kitchen Curtain Panels

The cost of fabric for this room was under four dollars per yard.  Not bad!

Tip #3:  Use Hardware You Have On Hand

I used the rods and curtain rings from our previous treatments, so that meant I only needed the fabric.

Tip #4:  Keep the Panel Style Simple

Keeping the panel style simple can cut the cost drastically.   With no pleating, you don’t need to add buckram.  This simple style has no fringe or trims.  Simplicity has that look of elegance.

Kitchen Curtain Panels

I wanted to block as little light as possible, so I used semi-sheer fabric.  I love the subtlety of the pattern.

Kitchen Curtain Panels

Tip #5:  Make Unlined Panels (not something I normally recommend, but it has its place)

These unlined curtain panels sew together in a snap!

The panels open fully and stack back against the wall.  These panels with the plain header offer the most versatility.  One thing is the distance of spread when closed, and another is that I can filter the lighting when needed.

Kitchen Curtain Panels

I never thought I’d put white curtains in this room!  Farm life can be dusty, dirty business.  Ha!  There’s a farm life hint hanging from the cabinet knob below the sink.  Thankfully, fly season has passed, so we’re not fighting them too much right now.  But the swatter is never far away no matter the season!

Kitchen Curtain Panels

Our kitchen gets more foot traffic than any other room.  Panels that stop at the window sills should be easier to keep clean.

Kitchen Curtain Panels

The panels over the counter will catch splatters occasionally from a mixer or food processor.  The panels are completely machine washable.  I’ll run them through a wash cycle and hang them back on the windows to dry.  Easy peasy!

Would you like to save money by making your own curtains?  If you don’t know how, would you like to learn?

Blessings~

I’m sharing at Metamorphosis Monday.

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How to Mix Fabric Prints Together in a Room – 5 Tips

As promised last Monday night, I was back again on Facebook Live on Saturday to share a little about mixing different fabric prints together when decorating a room.

Mixing Prints in Your Decor

Somehow, I forgot about introducing myself.  Stranger still, a high-school friend and former neighbor commented on the video.  He didn’t understand what I was doing, I suppose, but somehow the video popped up in his feed.

I decided to answer his comment rather than deleting it and thereby insulting him.  Facebook sure confuses me sometimes!

Five Tips for Choosing Fabrics That Mix Well Together

  1. Select a large print containing several colors that you like.
  2. Pick two to three colors to use in your room from the large print.
  3. Choose prints that are in keeping with your style – traditional, contemporary, modern, pr farmhouse, for example.
  4. Choose prints with different scale – large, medium and small.
  5. Choose prints with varying textures.

Here’s the mixture of prints with the added pop of gold I talked about in the video.

Mixing Prints in Your Decor

Would you add the gold for a bit of excitement, or would you play it safe and stay with the green and blue tones?

What other topics would you like me to discuss in future videos?

Blessings~

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This Will Make You The Curtain Panel BOSS!

It’s amazing how details add so much to a simple curtain panel.  A simple banded edge is an easy addition, and I share another consideration here that I’ve never heard mentioned before.

This technique will make you The Curtain Panel Boss!

How could we not be concerned about fading fabrics?

In case you missed it, I discussed all you need to know on Facebook Live.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fcurtainqueencreates%2Fvideos%2F1745208368826794%2F&show_text=0&width=560

It sure pays to plan ahead.  When we follow guided steps in order, things just work easier.  You know?

If you haven’t downloaded my guideline for sewing curtain panels, don’t miss out.  Get it now.

In yesterday’s post, I asked what time of day is best for you to take part in Facebook Live videos.  It really is better if you are watching Live – for me, at least.  I’m planning to be on Facebook Live this Saturday.

I ask you again to please share in the comments what time is best for you:  10 AM, 12 NOON, 5 PM, or 8 PM CST.

Blessings~

I’m sharing at Metamorphosis Monday.

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How to Shop On-Line for Decorator Fabrics – Plus Five Top Resources

My choice has always been to shop local stores and feel  the fabric I’m buying for window treatments, pillows, and such.  I want to touch it!

With on-line sources, you can still touch fabrics before buying.  Ordering a sample is easy – and sometimes with no postage added to the small price.

How to Shop On-Line for Decorator Fabrics

All stores have detailed descriptions of their fabrics and small samples for fairly cheap.  I recommend ordering sample swatches before ordering large amounts of fabrics (especially if you like to feel the fabric first.)  Also, no colors are true on-line since our computers display colors differently.

What to look for when purchasing decorator fabrics on-line:

  • Fabric content
  • Yarn dyed over piece died (yarn dyed has better durability and resistance to fading)
  • Price per yard and yardage available
  • Check width to be sure it’s at least 54″ wide (width less than 54″ indicates it’s not a decorator fabric and probably has less body)
  • Thread count per inch might be helpful information since a tighter weave is usually better
  • Vertical and horizontal repeats, which helps you know how much yardage to purchase.

Speaking of yardage repeats, get my free Yardage Calculation Worksheet and watch the companion video for completing the worksheet.

Also, check out my Pinterest  board for on-line fabric sources.  See over 400 Pins on my Home Decorator Fabrics Board!

I must tell you that I will receive no commissions for sharing these on-line companies with you.

The first one (which I’ve used in the past) is Brick House Fabrics.  The fabric I ordered came quickly and in line with their fabric description.  HH enjoys this pillow in his chair still after almost three years.  The fabric has not worn at all and has held up splendidly!

Brick House Toille Fabric

Sew-Easy Fringed Pillow…click image to see post.

Decorative Fabrics Direct seems to have the best stock of popular fabric choices.  (Lots of fabric styles!)  One option is my recent pursuit of red and white buffalo check, which is normally very hard to find.

Red and White Buffalo Check FabricSource Page

One drawback here is that the price is a little higher than I wish to pay, so let’s keep looking.

Fabric Guru has the absolute best prices but with limited choices.  Many fabrics have only enough yardage for a very small project.  I did find this buffalo check with enough yardage in a light blue and white for under ten dollars a yard.  Cashmere Blue.  Tempting!

Cashmere Blue Buffalo Check FabricSource Page

The best price for the red and white check is at Best Fabric Store.  (Could be the winner!)

Red and White Buggalo Check Fabric

Source Page

You’ll like what you see there…a coupons page – and free shipping for over $35/order.  I’m in!  🙂

Back to Brick House Fabrics on-line, the red and white buffalo check is pricey at $34 per yard.  Yikes!  But, the shipping is free for orders over $75.

Online Fabric Store has a 1″ check in several colors – and at a good price, but I want the larger check – 2″ at least.  Also, it’s listed as a gingham, so I suspect it’s a lighter weight fabric than I’d want for covering chair cushions.  (Oops!  I blew that surprise!)

Red and White Gingham FabricSource Page

 

So, are you ready to find fabric for your next project?  This information will certainly get you started in the right direction.

Blessings~

 

 

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